Is Fjällräven feeling the lightweight competition?

In the latest number of Fjällrävens spring and summer edition the first pages are seriously pointing out that lightweight materials and lightweight gear isn’t a must to have a great time in the outdoors.

“Lightweight” isn’t lightweight anymore…

“To chase experiences and not grams”

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Even though there’s some truth to this I can’t instantly start thinking that Fjällräven and simliar “heavy weight” material brand are starting to feel some pressure of the lightweight community. All this boils down to that they want to point out that their gear is super durable but still “lightweight enough” to not make you feel cumbersome on your trip. Sustainability is their leading word. I don’t blame them at all. I love that Fjällräven are one of the leading companies towards environmental sustainability just like Patagonia. That is one big factor for me when buying new gear. They must be durable enough to last for years but yet lightweight. On that last point Fjällräven fails but not according to them.

“But lightweight isn’t everything”

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On the next text filled page in the latest number they’re pointing out that it’s well know for Fjällrävens items to be passed along from generation to generation. I still feel that many of my lighter weight items would still be able to do just that.

Fredrik Hyltén-Cavallius, product developer,”For us lightweight isn’t everything, really, and we think that the products of the future will separate on this point. Our focus has always been on simple light and functional tents.”

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Well yeah. I can’t argue with that but that’s just saying that, all of our stuff will outlive everyone and everything. Sustainability again. I dig that stuff but lighter items be it a tent, a pair of pants or a jacket will still last for a very long time if you care about it. A “heavy duty item” will surely suffer the effect of time if not properly cared for.

I personally own two Fjällräven jackets, a heavy duty sweater, pants, a backpack, duffle and have previously owned a tent (my kids have a small Kånken each) and I can still say that my Patagonia items and similar brand feels just as durable as the Fjällrävens ones even though they’re much lighter and more often have smarter features. Right now, writing this, I even wear my Fjällräven Sörmland Roundneck Sweater, but I would never bring it on a backpacking trip.

What I’m going for with this is that you can be outdoors with both traditional, heavier, items or more lightweight stuff. But from my personal experience I prefer the lightweight option as I feel more comfortable and get to experience more with it as it’s less cumbersome. I do hope that these traditional brand takes a serious look at the cottage manufactures and changes their direction towards lighter but still durable items. I’d love a super lightweight Fjällräven jacket/pant on one of my future trips. But right now I can’t see that happening.

So, I chase the experience with grams. Even though it takes me some more time preparing before going on a trip rather than just visit the local outdoor shop and buy everything they have on the shelf to feel safe and secure.

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Lightweight isn’t less durable, if you’re not setting of to go to war with those items which I guess is not the case for most.

 

 

All the quotes in this article are freely translated. 

 

Latest Acquisitions

Patagonia Torrentshell jacket & pants. Underneath I have my Patagonia Nano Puff jacket that I’ve had for some time – it’s a great jacket! Buy it now 🙂

Both of the jackets are in size small even though all the charts says I should have a medium. Got the pants in medium even though I could have gotten the small but because in general I have more bulky pants than my sweater/jacket I went with the medium and I think it was a good choice.

The Torrentshell jacket stows away in the left hand side pocket making it really easy to pack.

The color of the jacket is Classic Tan that I think that you can’t really buy anymore. It’s listed as a ‘sale product’ at patagonia.com but that was the one that I wanted.

Before I went with this set I was very close to buy the Marmot Precip set but the fact that the guys at the store said it couldn’t be stowed in it’s own pocket and that the hood doesn’t have a draw cord to cinch it down I went with the Patagonia (The Precip has got a velcro closure that people have complained about, not working well). The Marmot Precip is also a tad bit cheaper.

raingear

Details

  • H2No® Performance Standard shell with waterproof/breathable 2.5-layer nylon ripstop
  • 2-way-adjustable hood with a laminated visor rolls down and stows
  • Microfleece-lined neck provides comfort and protects waterproof/ breathable barrier
  • Center-front zipper features minimal welt storm flap that creates a zipper-garage chin guard
  • Pockets: two zippered handwarmers and venting pit zips; all with welted exterior storm flaps and DWR-treated zippers
  • Self-fabric hook-and-loop cuff closures and adjustable drawcord hem seal out elements
  • Stows in self-stuff handwarmer pocket with carabiner clip-in loop
  • H2No® Performance Standard shell: 2.5-layer, 2.6-oz 50-denier 100% nylon ripstop with a waterproof/breathable barrier and a Deluge® DWR (durable water repellent) finish
  • 346 g (12.2 oz)
  • Made in Vietnam.

Fjällräven Gaiter Trousers No.1

Fjällräven Gaiter Trousers No.1 is a pair of pants that I’d really want, but they are juuuust a little over my budget for a pair of pants so to say.

Advanced trekking trousers in G-1000 Eco and G-1000 HD for demanding outdoor activities any season of the year. Innovative zip-off solution with built-in gaiter.

Gaiter Trousers No. 1 are advanced trekking trousers for long adventures in the outdoors, any time of the year. An innovative gaiter function makes it possible to adapt the trousers to different types of weather and terrain. In warm weather the lower section of the leg can be taken off to turn the trousers into shorts, just like a normal pair of zip-off trousers. The removed section has a drawcord adjustment at the calf that together with


What I really like about them are the cargo pockets that sits on the front of the pants instead of on the side like on a normal pair of cargo pants. More like a pair of pilot g-suit pants with map pockets strapped to the front. This way they’re easier to access with maps, papers, phones etc. I use those pockets on my Triple Aught Design Force 10 Cargo pants all the time, even though they’re smaller they’re very useful! Perfect for quick and easy access like I said.

These pants retails for about 3 000 SEK.

Here you’ll find more information about Fjällräven Numbers Series.